The Isaac Anolic Jewish Book Arts Awards goal is to honor this exceptional person: his passion for his profession, his dedication to all aspects of Jewish law and culture and his intense support of his families’ artistic endeavors by, in turn, supporting the work of dedicated professional artists, committed to creating art that focuses on the extraordinary ‘Am HaSefer’  - the people of the book.

Jewish Book Arts Award

Visual Arts Israel Travel Award


Bertha Anolic

The Anolic Family Awards originated as The Bertha Anolic Memorial Award (now known as the ‘Bertha Anolic Visual Arts Israel Travel Award’). Established shortly after her death, in 1973, by her husband, children, brother, and sisters, it was first awarded in 1980. For over thirty-five years this Israel Travel Award has been presented annually to a student studying in a university visual arts program. 

The Naomi Anolic Early Career Jewish Visual Arts Award was created in the early 1970’s to honor this young scholar and artist whose life was tragically cut short in 1969. The award was later added to the Anolic Family Award portfolio.
In 2015 the award supported scholarship in Jewish Art History and Visual Culture. In 2016 the award will focus on supporting young Jewish visual artists, in the area of painting and drawing, who are early in their artistic careers.

In 2014, The Isaac Anolic Jewish Book Arts Award was established to perpetuate the memory, dedication and passion of the husband of Bertha and father of Naomi, the man who established the Bertha Anolic Memorial Award. The Anolic Family Award is now comprised of these three awards and is currently administered by the Hillel of Greater Philadelphia under the direction of Rita Rosen Poley, with the assistance of Melissa Rubin.
 



Isaac Anolic

Early Career Jewish Visual Arts Award

Naomi Anolic



The Isaac Anolic Jewish Book Arts Award is named in honor of Isaac Anolic (1909-2012).  A practicing attorney for over 70 years Isaac was devoted to the law – both secular and religious. He was highly respected in the field of law and as a spiritual and learned member of his congregation. He studied the torah and Talmud weekly throughout his life and deeply studied all aspects of Jewish life, culture and history. Isaac was a world traveler for over 80 years. He inspired trust, love and dedication from his immediate and extended family and a deep multi-generational network of friends.

Naomi Anolic, the oldest daughter of Isaac and Bertha Anolic, was an exceptionally talented, bright and caring person until her life was tragically cut short at age 27. A professional artist and a highly regarded Psychiatric Social Worker, her potential was recognized by all who came in contact with her. Interested in all aspects of contemporary and classical culture, she also possessed a strong innate curiosity about the peoples and cultures of the world. She traveled extensively, usually with just her sketchbook and watercolors to record her experiences in place of a camera. She deeply touched many during her brief life. 

The Naomi Anolic Memorial Award’s goal is to perpetuate her memory and honor her scholarship, involvement in the arts, and unfulfilled potential, by supporting others who are striving to realize their personal potential and goals of furthering the Jewish contribution to the visual arts and culture.  
 
Bertha Anolic received her MFA and continued advanced studies toward a PhD in Art at Columbia University. Throughout her life she pursued painting, sculpture, jewelry design and fabrication. Her interests extended, as well, into fashion design, and collecting and restoring antiques. She continued to pursue these areas while raising three children. She came from a family that was involved in every facet of the arts and she gave her own children a love of the arts and helped them develop their talents as artists. Bertha had a strong Hebrew background and came from an Orthodox family.  

The Anolic family established this award in her loving memory and in recognition of her unusual and diverse talents as an artist and her involvement in Jewish life. It serves as the most fitting memorial to a special person who touched many lives: a living memorial to promote the development of Judaism and Israel through the visual arts.

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